How to Encourage Your Partner to Get Healthy

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When you exercise regularly and eat healthy and are working hard to improve your fitness, it can be frustrating to have a partner or other family members that don’t do the same. Usually, our first instinct is to do whatever we can to get them on board, right? But there are good ways to do that and some not so good ways.

First of all, understand that it has to be your partner’s choice and decision. No matter what, you can’t force someone else’s behavior change but you can encourage and support it. Just be patient. I’ve worked in the fitness industry for almost 25 years and have been married for almost 23 and my husband just adopted a regular exercise routine in the last two years. Talk about patience!!

  1. The number 1 thing you can do is be an example. Continue your regular exercise routine and healthy eating habits. If your healthier lifestyle has you sleeping better, mention that. If you’re missing less work, mention it. If your back pain is gone, mention it. Hopefully, your spouse or partner notices these things on their own but if not, its ok to talk about the positive impact fitness has had on you. Don’t brag or be condescending, though, because that will backfire! See #2 below!
  2. Making snarky or sarcastic comments (even if they come across funny) doesn’t send a good message. Embarrassment, shame or nagging usually has the opposite effect and your partner will dig his heels in and go in the opposite direction. And lets be honest, do you really want to embarrass your significant other? Even if this tactic works in the short term, your partner will be doing it begrudgingly so it won’t last.
  3. Send the right message. Make sure your partner knows that you want them to exercise and eat well because its good for them and will improve and enhance their life and their family’s life. If you talk about setting future goals together such as being available for your kids and grandkids, that can be very motivating. Having personal goals is an important step but setting goals together as a couple or a family helps too.
  4. Don’t make choices for them. It’s not your place to tell them they should lose 20 pounds or they should stop eating McDonald’s. Leave that to the doctors! “Should” statements are very judgy! Your partners first priority might be to work on their flexibility so they can tie their shoes. Don’t assume that you know what they should or want to improve.
  5. Remember that your way is not the only way. Maybe you love Crossfit but your spouse wants to go running. Or you go to Pilates and your partner wants to learn martial arts. Let them figure out what works for them. My husband is a meticulous food tracker and I don’t track food at all. We each have our own way of doing things and it works for each of us. Be supportive even if its not something you like to do.
  6. Stock the kitchen with healthy foods you both like. This goes along with tip number 5 about not expecting your partner to do exactly what you do. Instead of trying to force them to eat what you eat, find out what healthier options they might be open to even if it’s something you don’t like.
  7. Lastly, always stay positive. Always. Recognize the smallest of steps even if your partner only makes 1 positive choice out of 15 negative choices. Don’t attack your partner if they skip a workout or decide to have a handful of cookies or an order of cheesy fries. Encourage the positive, ignore the negative.

Be patient. Be positive. Be supportive. They’ll get there eventually!

Happy Exercising!

 

 

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Home Step Workout

Working out at home allows me a lot of flexibility with my schedule but can sometimes be limiting since I only have a certain amount of equipment. I get creative with things around the house, such as a step or fireplace hearth. This is a simple but very effective workout. It left we wiped out with my legs feeling like Jell-O!

Make sure you have a sturdy step and that you plant your feet solidly on the step when you’re working out.

1 minute of walking step-ups.

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1 minute of running step-ups.

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30 reps of alternating lunges.

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30 reps of angled push-ups.

 

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Another 1 minute of running step-ups.

30 reps of side squats. Switch sides halfway through.

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30 reps of tricep dips.

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Another 1 minute of running step-ups.

Another 1 minute of walking step-ups.

I repeat this circuit 2-3 times depending on how much time I have and how I feel.

Happy Exercising!

 

 

Why Women Don’t Exercise

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A recent study determined 3 major reasons women don’t exercise…

  1. Concerns about appearance. Women don’t want to look foolish or look like they don’t know what they’re doing.
  2. Concerns about ability. Many women feel like they have to be “in shape” to work out in a gym. (“I join the gym AFTER I lose some weight.”)
  3. Concerns about being judged. This one encompasses the previous two concerns. Most women fear judgement of their appearance, their ability and worst of all…being judged for putting themselves first.

In my opinion, these are all terrible but this last one really breaks my heart. Women are seriously judged unfavorably for TAKING CARE of themselves!! Shaming of any kind, fit or fat is unacceptable. I’m not totally sure how to change things and I know I can’t do it alone but something needs to change.

In my experience, people who judge others or make negative comments about others lifestyle choices are really trying to make themselves feel better about their own choices. For example, if I’m “selfish” for taking personal time for exercise then their lack of exercise makes them seem “normal”.

THIS MAKES NO SENSE TO ME AT ALL.

I’m not going to spout a bunch of motivational sayings or “girl power” crap because that’s not my style. These are real, valid fears and one thing I CAN do is help find ways to overcome them and help you reach your health goals.

  1. Select a workout location that makes you comfortable. If you want to join a gym, check out several before making a decision. Gyms have a unique atmosphere and subculture that can be motivating or intimidating, depending on what you’re in to. Check out the Body Positive Fitness Alliance to find facilities and trainers that promote an inclusive atmosphere. If you don’t want to join a gym or it’s not an option that’s ok. But don’t let that keep you from exercising. Your living room or back yard is an excellent place to start your fitness journey.
  2. If you’re not sure what to do or don’t want to look clueless at the gym, consider hiring a personal trainer or fitness coach. I know this is an additional expense but its well worth it if it makes you more comfortable and more likely to exercise. Some trainers are available for individual sessions (rather than buying a pack of sessions) to help get you started. Fitness trainers are not exclusive to elite athletes or the very rich. We work with everyone! A good trainer will help you learn and work at your pace to make sure you’re comfortable and confident. Just like with gyms, shop around until you find a trainer you feel good with.
  3. I know this may be easier said than done, but try to remember that most people are not fit their entire lives. Anybody in your gym who is very fit didn’t start out that way and if they pay you any attention at all, they’re most likely thinking “I’ve been there. Good for you!”. Try to focus on the task at hand and complete YOUR workout to the best of your ability. If you focus on how exercise makes you feel and the progress you’re making, everything else just becomes background noise.
  4. If you’re family or friends are not on board with supporting your choices, have a frank conversation with them. Explain WHY you’re making these choices and explain how their comments or actions affect you. They may not realize that their off-hand comments have a negative impact. The more people in your circle that you can educate about why your choices are important to you, the better you’ll feel.
  5. Remind yourself that your healthy habits make you healthier so you are better able to care for your kids, spouse, parents, or whoever. Taking one hour for yourself so you can have the energy and confidence to juggle the other 23 hours of the day seems like a pretty good trade-off to me.
  6. Lastly, we live in a social media world but that doesn’t mean that everything you do has to be public. If you’re concerned about other moms judging you for taking time for yourself, well, why do they need to know? You can keep your habits private if you choose. I don’t mean you should keep it a secret but random people on Facebook don’t need to know everything!

I’ll continue to promote the importance of health and wellness and the impact it has on every aspect your life. And I’ll continue to combat the feelings of fear with my clients any way I can. Please comment or message me if you have additional ideas for combating this trend.

Happy Exercising!

3 Ways to Make Your Strength Routine More Efficient

I enjoy exercise. Moving and sweating and pushing myself. But that doesn’t mean I want to spend hours and hours on my workout. I’m busy just like everyone else so I need to create efficient exercise routines.

I’m not a bodybuilder or figure competitor so I have no need for dozens of exercises that hit every individual muscle. There’s nothing wrong with that type of training (I’ve used it at other times in my life) its just not what I need right now.

If you’re like me and need an effective and efficient workout too, follow these principles…

1. Compound Movements

Compound movements are exercises that involve multiple muscle groups. Working multiple muscles at once certainly saves time. These can all be done with or without added weight. Things like:

Squat Presses – after you squat down and return to a standing position, press the weight overhead.

 

Row to Stiff-Leg Deadlift – bend over at your hips with weight hanging straight down. Pull weight up to chest. Return to start. Contract glutes and lower back to stand up straight.

Walking Lunge with Alternating Shoulder Raise – step forward into a lunge position while lifting both arms to at least shoulder height. One arm at front and one arm to the side. On the next step alternate arm positions.

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Lunge with Shoulder Raise

Kettlebell Swings – start with the kettlebell between your legs in a slight squat. Contract glutes and hamstrings to thrust the weight forward and lift to about shoulder height.

I could go on and on but you get the idea.

2. Circuits

Circuits are a great way to get a quick workout in when your schedule is busy. Alternate upper and lower body movements and move from one exercise to the next without stopping. For example, squats, pushups, lunges, bent over row, etc.

3. Intensity Level

Adding more weight to your current routine (within reason!) can increase your intensity just enough to give your program a little boost. If you’ve been just going through the motions or doing a set number of reps without considering how challenged your muscles are, then maybe its time to increase the weight to make your workout more efficient and effective.

Happy Exercising!

Kettlebells

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Need an effective, quick workout that only requires one simple piece of equipment? A full-body kettlebell workout to the rescue!

Kettlebells have been used for hundreds of years but they seem to be the trend right now. And for good reason. Kettlebells are compact and sturdy. They don’t take up a lot of storage space and they don’t break easily. They come in a variety of weights and you can do lots of exercises with just this one piece of equipment. Kettlebells are a great addition, or a great start, to a home gym. You can buy them at most local sporting goods stores or online.

If you have a kettlebell or plan to buy one, here’s a workout to get you started.

Deadlift 

Stand tall with core tight and feet hip width apart. Hinge at hips, knees slightly bent and back flat. Squeeze glutes to return to start.

Overhead press

Stand tall with core tight and feet about shoulder width apart. Lift kettlebell overhead, pause and return to start.

Squat

Start with feet wide and toes pointed out slightly. Hold the kettlebell close and squat down as far as comfortable keeping your toes in line with your knees. Press back to start.

Bent over row

Start with feet staggered and hand right hand on right knee for balance and support. Hold kettlebell straight down in left hand. Keeping core tight, drive elbow up to lift kettlebell. Repeat on other side

Swings

Start with feet wide, core tight and back straight. Hold kettlebell between your legs and back behind your hips. With a controlled motion, swing bell by contracting your glutes and pressing your hips forward. Use muscle not momentum!

Upright row

Start with feet shoulder width apart and bell down in front of you. Keep core tight and back flat. Lift the bell straight up in front of you leading with your elbows. Pause and return to start.

 

Happy Exercising!!

Vacation Workout

I’m on vacation and yes, I have a workout plan. I know what you’re thinking, only crazy people workout on their vacation.

I’m not diligent about getting my workout in on vacation but if I’m away from exercise too long I start to not feel good and I get cranky. It’s better for everyone around me if I get some physical activity!

That being said, I fit it in when I can and don’t worry when I can’t. I don’t take away from family time and I don’t skip other activities that I want to do just to workout. My vacation is two weeks long and I maybe work out 4-5 times  at most.

If you choose to exercise on vacation don’t expect to make gains or lose weight. You may even lose a little strength and endurance but that’s ok…It’s a vacation after all, enjoy it!

A run, a long walk or even a stretching session can be good exercise and still keep you relaxed. Especially if you can do it early in the day before everyone else is up.

The following are 3 different workout plan options you can do anywhere. A hotel room, condo balcony, poolside or even on the beach. Do one of them, two of them or all 3 if you’re feeling really ambitious. Sorry if the pictures are a bit blurry or goofy… teenage photographer!!

Workout 1 – do each exercise for 1 minute with 30 seconds rest between and do the whole circuit twice.

Skaters – jump sideways from foot to foot

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Standing side crunches

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Pike shoulder presses – in a downward dog position, bend elbows to lower and then push back up


Sumo squats

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V-sit leg flutters

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Workout 2 – Do the whole circuit twice

Walking lunges x 20 reps

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Push-ups 10-20 reps

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Plank 30 seconds

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Squat with kickback x 20 reps – squat down and upon returning to start, press your leg back at your hip. Alternate legs.


Tricep dips 10-20 reps – these can be done on the ground if necessary but a bench or a chair makes them a little more productive.

Workout 3 – do each exercise for 1 minute with 30 seconds rest between and do the whole circuit three times.

Jumping jacks

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Side leg lifts

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Jog in place

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Heel touch crunches – in a crunch position, squeeze from side to side touching your heels with the tips of your fingers.

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Mountain climbers

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Happy Exercising!

Are You Warming Up Properly?

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Dynamic Warm-UP

What kind of warmup do you do before your workout? You DO warm-up, don’t you?!

Don’t worry, I’m guilty of not bothering to warm-up, too. That being said, as a fitness coach, I try to practice what I preach and a warm-up IS a good idea. However, it doesn’t have to be elaborate or lengthy. I know we’re all time-crunched and don’t want to waste the precious minutes we’re able to carve out of our day for a workout with a warm-up. But, here’s why its a good idea…

It gradually increases blood flow to the muscles and increases muscle temperature which in turn increases the oxygen available to the working muscles. This keeps the more intense exercise to come from being a shock to your system.
There is some evidence to suggest that a warm-up will help prevent injuries. As with many subjects, there is no definitive answer on this and there are people and studies on both sides.
A warm-up can help you mentally prepare for the workout or event to come. Especially if its going to be a tough one.

So what should your warm-up look like?

Forget everything you learned about warm-ups from your middle school phys. ed. teacher or your high school coach (unless they were very progressive and in-the-know :). Jogging for 30 minutes or more, bending over to touch your toes or contorting your body into odd stretches is not the best way to warm-up.

A dynamic warm-up is best. One in which you are moving at a low intensity ideally in the same types of motions as the workout. For example, if you’re going for a run, then the warm-up should be an easy run of just a few minutes. Your total warm-up only needs to be 10-15 minutes long, if that. You can, and should, incorporate other dynamic movements to loosen up your joints and gently stretch your muscles. Static stretching (sitting or standing and holding a stretch without moving) has been shown to not be a very effective warm-up.

The following are a few dynamic warm-up activities you can do. Just 30 seconds or so for each.

Bounding – This is basically exaggerated running. Leap from foot to foot with a long stride for about 10 meters or so.

High skipping – Again, an exaggerated exercise. Skip for about 10 meters, pushing off with force to go as high as you can.

High knees – Run, moving forward with small steps and bringing your knees up high so your thighs are about parallel to the ground.

Butt kicks – Run with small steps and bringing your heels to your butt. Try to maintain normal arm swing during this motion.

Hip swings – Stand with feet hip width apart. Hold onto something for balance if necessary. Swing your right leg forward and backward from your hip 5-10 times and switch legs.

Trunk twists – Stand with feet hip width apart and hands on hips. Twist your upper body from side to side to loosen up your low back.

Arm circles – Holding your arms at shoulder height, move them in wide circles to loosen and warm-up the shoulders.

Jumping jacks – This is a great full-body warm-up activity Everyone can do them and they can modified if necessary and don’t take a lot of space.

Let me know in the comments if you have a favorite warm-up activity I haven’t included.

 

Happy Exercising!