Is the Fat Burning Zone a Mythical Creature?

My husband I were recently discussing a similar topic so I thought I would re-share this blog post from 2017.

IMG_1208

Is the Fat Burning Zone a mythical creature?

It must be! Otherwise, all those people plodding along on the treadmills at the gym would be in great shape. Like a beautiful, sparkly unicorn, we want to believe that it exists but the concept of the fat burning zone has been regularly misinterpreted and misunderstood.

The fat burning zone theory is that lower intensity exercise, at about 55% – 70% of maximum heart rate, burns more fat. Basically, your body burns more fat at a lower intensity of aerobic exercise than it does at a higher intensity. This sounds good in theory. After all why work harder if you don’t have to, right?

The misinterpretation of this theory happens because there is a difference between percentage of fat burned vs. actual fat burned. In reality, you burn a higher percentage of fat at lower intensities but generally more fat overall at higher intensities. Your body draws energy from two sources, fat and glycogen or stored carbohydrates. The percentages of these two fuel sources vary depending on the intensity of your exercise.

At a lower intensity, you may burn 60% of total calories from fat. And at a higher intensity only 45% of total calories from fat. On the surface, that seems like lower intensity would be better. But at a higher intensity you burn more calories OVERALL which bumps your actual fat calories up even though the percentage is lower.

For example:

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-30 at 1.19.53 PM

The numbers above are just for example purposes but hopefully, you get the point. Percentage vs. actual are very different. Lower intensity exercise has its place in a workout program but if you’re relying on it to help you burn fat, it’s not the best idea. Circuit or interval workouts are efficient and help you burn more calories in less time.

Click here to get a FREE PDF download of high intensity workouts you can do right in your living room!

Stop searching for the mythical creature! To truly burn maximum fat, focus on building muscle with a comprehensive strength training program and healthy eating habits. These will do far more to help you reach your goals then chasing the unicorn at the end of the treadmill!

Happy Exercising!

P.S. If you want help creating an effective exercise program, check out my monthly coaching services here.

4 Tips for Dealing with Back Pain

If you’re anything like me (almost 46) your low back doesn’t always cooperate with how old you think you are, or feel you are, or wish you were!

I injured my low back in college (tip: don’t jump off a bunkbed) and that combined with my abysmal hip and hamstring flexibility makes me feel like I’m 100 years old when I wake up in the morning. Some days it takes me a good 20 minutes to be able to move fluidly and not look like I should be living in a bell tower.

Since I’ve lived with a creaky back for a really long time I’ve learned what works to keep my back as functional as possible. If you have a specific injury, please follow your doctor’s recommendations.

  1. Bed rest rarely works. Staying active is the best thing you can do. Regular movement improves mobility and blood flow. Stretching will keep you moving and strength training will build your back muscles to help you be able to do more. Building up your core strength will also keep your back from hurting as much in the future. When I take time off from my regular workouts, I definitely feel it.
  2. Stretching. I stretch my back every day. I’m not talking about a lengthy flexibility program (although maybe I should!). Just 30 seconds when I stand up out of bed in the morning. I bend side to side, lean over and reach for my toes, and twist right to left. It isn’t much but it helps me loosen up enough to get to the coffee. When my back gets especially bad, laying prone over an exercise ball so my body is fully supported, helps me stretch and relieves pressure on my back.
  3. Practicing proper posture. I know this is hard sometimes. Especially when you’re tired but sitting and standing straight will help protect your back and the more you practice it, the easier it will become.
  4. Not staying in one spot for too long. I spend a lot of time at my desk writing things like this blog and I have a comfortable chair but sitting in one spot all day makes my back tired and achy. I stand up every so often and stretch and move around. Sometimes I use the dictation feature so I can stand at my desk and still work.

I hate that my back injury makes me feel so old but I know I would feel so much worse if I didn’t actively care for it. Check out this page on my site for more specific stretching and strengthening exercises.

Happy Exercising!

P.S. I can help you with a specific program to strengthen your back if you deal with daily pain. Contact me so we can chat.