1-Year Anniversary and 3D Pictures

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The 1-year anniversary of my breast cancer surgery is coming up in a couple days and I’ve been reflecting on the last year and how it all started. With a 3-D mammogram.

Regular mammograms are so important and when I was offered the option to have a 3-D mammogram done, I took it even though I would need to pay an additional out-of-pocket fee for it. My insurance only covered part of the screening. I didn’t really know the difference between a regular mammogram and a 3D one but my very quick and limited research indicated a 3D mammogram created better pictures.

Traditional mammography takes a single picture versus 3D mammography which takes multiple pictures or slices. The multiple pictures are used to make a 3D image that is clearer and easier to read. These images help detect more cancers and detect them early and help doctors see the size of the cancer easier. It also reduces false positives.

A lot of the research on the effectiveness of a 3D versus traditional mammogram is published by companies that manufacture the screening machines and doesn’t necessarily show a huge difference between them. There is some debate that the more accurate, clearer picture may show abnormalities that require further testing thus producing unnecessary stress and anxiety.

Here’s some more information about the greatness of 3D mammograms from breastcancer.org

A study looking at 3 years of data on breast cancer screening with 3-D mammograms has found that the benefits of 3-D mammograms last over time.

The study was published online on Feb. 18, 2016 by JAMA Oncology. Read the abstract of “Effectiveness of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Compared With Digital Mammography: Outcomes Analysis From 3 Years of Breast Cancer Screening.”

Benefits of 3D Mammograms Last Over Time

“These findings reaffirm that 3-D mammography is a better mammogram for breast cancer screening,” said Emily Conant, M.D., chief of breast imaging at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, who was the senior author of the study. Dr. Conant also is a member of the Breastcancer.org Professional Advisory Board. “These results are an important step toward informing policies so that all women can receive 3-D mammography for screening.”

Based on my personal experience, I highly recommend a 3D mammogram. I was fortunate that my cancer was very small and caught very early. My amazing surgeon indicated that a 3D mammogram was the reason my cancer was caught early. A traditional mammogram may not have caught it and I would have gone a whole year before another screening. In hindsight, the best $50 I EVER spent.

But, sadly, many insurance companies don’t cover the full cost or even part of the cost of a 3-D mammogram. Many women, including me, can afford to pay out-of-pocket fees on top of our insurance coverage to have this more advanced screening but far too many women don’t have that option.

If you have the means, please consider donating to help someone and if you need assistance, here’s a search tool  to help. Please help me spread the word.

*steps off soapbox…

Happy Exercising!

Quick, Full-body Medicine Ball Workout

If you’ve never worked out with a medicine ball, here’s a quick full-body workout to try.

Medicine ball workouts are efficient. You only need one little piece of equipment and you can work most major muscle groups with it.

You can get medicine balls at sporting goods stores or online here (affiliate link) in a range of weights. They’re portable too! I took mine on vacation so I could maintain some semblance of fitness without getting crazy about it. I use this workout occasionally for variety or when traveling or when I’m simply short on time. I do 2-3 sets of each exercise.

Squat with front lift: Stand with feet shoulder width apart holding the medicine ball with arms straight down in front of you. Squat down until knees are at least 90 degrees or slightly lower. At the same time, lift the medicine ball straight up to shoulder level keeping arms straight. Return to start and repeat.

Squat with Front Lift

Lunge Press: Stand with feet hip width apart holding the medicine ball in front of your chest with elbows pointed down. Take a large step forward with your left foot and lower straight down so your left knee is at 90 degrees or slightly lower. At the same time, press the medicine ball up overhead. Return to start and repeat with right leg.

Lunge Press

Off-Set Pushups: Start in pushup position with hands slightly wider than shoulder width and feet together with toes curled under. Your body should from a straight line from the back of your head to your heels. Place the medicine ball under your right hand so you are balancing your right arm on top of it. Lower your body as a solid unit until your elbows are bent at 90 degrees or slightly lower. You’ll feel lopsided because of the medicine ball but try to maintain your balance and don’t let the ball roll around. Complete 1 set and switch the ball to the left side for the next set.

Off-Set Pushups

Extended Crunches: Lay on the floor with knees bent and feet about hip width apart. Hold the medicine ball straight up over your chest. Tighten your abs and lift your shoulders off the ground to “crunch” up. Return to start and repeat.

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Extended Crunches

Tricep Extensions: Stand with feet hip-width apart, abs tight and hold the medicine ball straight up over your head. Keeping elbows still and tight by the side of your head, bend your elbows and lower the medicine ball behind your head. Return to start and repeat.

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Tricep Extensions

Bicep Curls: Stand with feet hip-width apart, abs tight and hold the medicine ball straight down in front of you. Keep elbows tight to your sides and bend to lift the medicine ball to your chest. Return to start and repeat.

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Bicep Curls

Happy Exercising!

P.S. My son took these photos for me and captured some amusing facial expressions so, enjoy!